Dry Tortugas National Park Is 99% Underwater — and That’s Exactly Why It’s a Must-visit

Dry Tortugas National Park Is 99% Underwater — and That’s Exactly Why It’s a Must-visit

This article originally in Travel+Leisure.

Editor's Note: Those who choose to travel are strongly encouraged to check local government restrictions, rules, and safety measures related to COVID-19 and take personal comfort levels and health conditions into consideration before departure.

Wide-open spaces are the name of the game in today's pandemic-ravaged tourism landscape, which is why travelers all over the U.S. are flocking to national parks. But a national park that’s 99% underwater, located 70 miles from civilization, and accessible only by seaplane or boat? That’s next-level traveling, perfectly suited to the times.

Enter Dry Tortugas National Park, one of just three designated national parks in Florida — and one of the most remote in the entire U.S. National Park System.

Planning a Trip to Dry Tortugas National Park

Dry Tortugas National Park comprises a cluster of seven small islands, but most of the 100-square-mile park is water — mesmerizingly blue, crystal-clear water worthy of the wildest tropical dreams. It’s perfect for both swimming and sightseeing, two of the main draws of the Dry Tortugas.

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